All Research

'Community and prosperity beyond social capital: The case of Newham, East London'

UK

Using data from Newham, London, this article argues that a narrow focus on social capital obfuscates the complexity of community dynamics, leading to misconceptions about the causes of social fragmentation. In the case of Newham, we show that while survey data on social capital suggests that diversity is detrimental to community life, a more nuanced analysis reveals that it is in fact an important part of community cohesion.

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'Prosperity in crisis and the longue durée in Africa'

Africa

This article uses research from Kenya and Zambia to demonstrate how a long-running – but temporally and spatially variable – focus on agricultural productivity has shaped the character of rural life in Africa, and why it has consistently failed to deliver enlarged forms of prosperity based on quality of life and ecological well-being.

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'Super-diversity and the prosperous society'

UK

Drawing on ethnographic material from East London, the authors contend that, in super-diverse places, ethnic diversity could become a valuable aspect of community life, while inequalities in social, cultural and symbolic capital become central points of social antagonism to the detriment of prosperity.

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Back to the Grindstone?

Africa

This article presents observations on grinding-stone implements and their uses in Elgeyo-Marakwet County, northwest Kenya.

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Landscape, time and cultural resilience

Africa

In their article 'Landscape, time and cultural resilience: a brief history of agriculture in Pokot and Marakwet, Kenya' Matthew Davies and Henrietta Moore consider the Marakwet and Pokot communities of northwest Kenya, both of which have been subjected to a range of external agricultural interventions. The authors find a dynamic, yet hidden ‘cultural resilience’ spanning several centuries.

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Women, marketplaces and exchange partners amongst the Marakwet of northwest Kenya

Africa

Based on recent fieldwork, this paper examines the intersecting economic activities of Marakwet women in northwest Kenya with a particular focus on exchange friendships. We highlight the need to expand previous definitions of tilia, based on male exchange of livestock, to include a variety of exchange friendships including those between women.

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'Global Prosperity and Sustainable Development Goals'

Prosperity

There is no single route to prosperity; diversity of objectives is essential and fundamental. Learning from initiatives in the Global South, such as the case of agroecology, might pave the way towards this paradigm shift.

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Ethiopia Control of Bovine TB Strategies (ETHICOBOTS)

Africa

Bovine tuberculosis in Ethiopia is a rapidly growing issue, not just for the agricultural sector but with wider social, economic and health implications.

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The next big challenge!

UK

Henrietta L. Moore has been appointed to lead the new Institute of Global Prosperity at University College London (UCL). The institute will be part of The Bartlett, UCL’s Faculty of the Built Environment in October when Professor Moore joins UCL.

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The Marakwet Research Station

Africa

The Marakwet Research Station is situated in Tot-Sibou Village in the Kerio Valley, northwest Kenya

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Editorial: Female genital mutilation/cutting

Africa

Targeted interventions can work, but more remains to be done to change people’s behaviour

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‘Avatars and Robots: The Imaginary Present and the Socialities of the Inorganic’

Other

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'Epistemology and Ethics: Perspectives from Africa’

Africa

There has been much discussion in anthropology of the problem of belief and of the difficulties inherent in understanding and interpreting alternative life-worlds. One consequence of anthropological understanding and interpretation being intimately tied to the epistemological and ethical project of contextualization is that other people’s knowledge is often rendered as parochial, defined by its local contexts and scope.

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‘The Truths of Anthropology’

Other

Let’s start with a deceptively simple question: is truth the aim of our inquiries? If the search for truth is an impossible one then what is the purpose of our endeavours? Some have suggested that truth does not exist, that it cannot be more than relative or subjective. In these arguments there is often an untimely slippage between the idea that truth is unstable, absolutely not absolute, and the view that truth is therefore not something to be sought, not something worth bothering about.

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‘On Being Young’

Other

I want to suggest that there are three key areas of theoretical difficulty: how to theorise children’s agency, how to theorise their rights, and how to theorise the nature of the ‘child’ itself. These are not new theoretical questions. They are all interconnected, and they link to and underpin such diverse domains of enquiry as children and social policy, war trauma and child soldiers, cognitive development, language use, sexuality and labour.

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‘Global anxieties: concept-metaphors and pre-theoretical commitments in anthropology’

Other

This article begins by interrogating the problem of the globa land the local in anthropology, and asks how their interconnections might be theorized. When anthropologists call for an examination of the global in concrete terms, they often fail to appreciate the place of ‘concept-metaphors’ whose purpose is to maintain ambiguity and a productive tension between universal claims and specific historical contexts.

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The Business of Funding: Science, Social Science and Wealth in the United Kingdom

UK

Two events loomed large in the imagination of those employed by universities in England this year: the publication of the Research Assessment Exercise results and the agreement on a new review system for quality assurance in Higher Education.

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'The Health of Children and Young People: Setting a Research Agenda'

UK

This paper summarises and updates the report of one of the seven Expert Working Groups established by the UK’s Health Education Authority (HEA) in October 1996 to look at the potential for health promotion with key populations – in this case that of children and young people. It seeks to establish a revitalised agenda for research into the health and wellbeing of children and young people in the UK.

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The Future of Work

Gender

This paper looks at the changing nature of work, drawing primarily on examples from the less developed and newly industrialized countries of the world. It suggests several ways we might have to revise or extend our understanding of the term 'work' in light of increased female participation in the waged labour force.

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''Divided We Stand': Sex, Gender and Sexual Difference.'

Gender

Moore, H. (1994). 'Divided We Stand': Sex, Gender and Sexual Difference. Feminist Review, 47, pp. 78-95.

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