Editorial: Female genital mutilation/cutting

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Published: Tuesday 1 October, 2013



Moore, Henrietta L. ‘Editorial: Female genital mutilation/cutting’ BMJ 2013; 347

Targeted interventions can work, but more remains to be done to change people’s behaviour

In December 2012, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution to intensify global efforts to eliminate female genital mutilation/cutting. As the recent Unicef report argues, evidence played a major part in driving this resolution through. But what is the character of the available evidence, and what is known about how to accelerate change to bring about the desired result? Although the tone of the report is resolutely upbeat, the reality on the ground seems more uncertain and fragile.

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