Women, marketplaces and exchange partners amongst the Marakwet of northwest Kenya

Marakwet Research Station

Published: Tuesday 24 November, 2015



Davies, Matthew I.J., Moore, Henrietta L., and Pollard, Grace. (2015) 'Women, marketplaces and exchange partners amongst the Marakwet of northwest Kenya.' Journal of Eastern African Studies 9(3)

Based on recent fieldwork, this paper examines the intersecting economic activities of Marakwet women in northwest Kenya with a particular focus on exchange friendships. We highlight the need to expand previous definitions of tilia, based on male exchange of livestock, to include a variety of exchange friendships including those between women. Through investigating women's economic activities in local marketplaces, we demonstrate that marketplaces facilitate the formation of tilia partnerships between women from different areas, and shape women's kinship and friendship interactions within the context of their market activities. We argue that there is a synergy between women's market activities and exchange relationships, but we also emphasise that market activities and tiliaexchange relationships are part of the matrix of household economic decision-making navigated by Marakwet women. This has important implications for how we view and support the social and economic contributions of women's activities. Women's tilia relations provide a number of benefits to their trading activities, households and communities, and as such we suggest that rural development interventions would do well to consider and build upon these networks of exchange relations.

View the full paper online here.

Share this article:




Recent Posts

Why a new definition of prosperity and radical ideas are needed to build back better post-pandemic and how to achieve this

Media

Using GDP alone to determine prosperity is inadequate and misleading, leading policy makers to draw faulty conclusions about levels of prosperity and appropriate interventions. But this new index is based on the theory that by sharing knowledge and trying radical new approaches, more innovative policy options that are targeted to specific local communities and effective at improving quality of life will open up...

Read More

Henrietta Moore: The new unitary authorities should be outriders for further devolution

Media

Read More

"We are being suffocated by fossil fuel emissions on a daily basis"

Commentary

Recent research shows that Lebanon could witness an increase of 1.2 to 3.2 degrees in temperatures in areas that are already very arid and suffer from water shortage. An increase in temperature and a decrease in precipitation will have particular impact on the electricity sector - a higher cooling demand in summer and increased consumption for electricity. Rising sea levels and water scarcity in Lebanon could lead to internal climate migration and mass displacement from rural to coastal regions affecting agricultural output, jobs and livelihoods. The economic situation in the cities that are already prone to poverty, illiteracy and unemployment could become worse.

Read More