Acceptability and Feasibility of Proposed Control and Prevention Strategies for Bovine Tuberculosis among Ethiopian Dairy Farmers and Associated Professionals

Journal 2

Published: Monday 10 August, 2020



A series of Focus Group Discussions were held with farmers, veterinarians and human health workers in two sites in Ethiopia, as part of the Ethiopia Control of Bovine Tuberculosis Strategies Project’s efforts to devise and test the acceptability and feasibility of various control strategies for Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB). Group members were asked to give their responses to a range of strategies collected from global efforts to control the disease in cattle and humans in the context of intensification of the dairy industry, as well as those suggested by researchers within the project. Key findings from the study include the observation that a number of strategies utilised routinely to control bTB elsewhere in the world, including ‘Test and Slaughter’ and ‘Test and Segregation’ are likely to be impractical in low-resource settings where infrastructure may be unreliable and space both between and on individual farms is limited. It also became clear that farmers called upon to implement biosecurity measures should be supplied with locally-specific information and instructions in order to effectively control and prevent the spread of disease. Additionally, this research supports the need for investment in animal health system strengthening in Ethiopia and other similar settings, in order to enable animal health workers, including veterinarians, to devote time to disease surveillance and farmer sensitisation. Similarly, investment in milk pasteurisation processes and public education on these processes should be prioritised in order to increase their acceptability and feasibility among both producers and consumers.

Hodge, C., Deneke, T. T., Endalew, M. A., Moore, H. L., & consortium, T. E. T. H. I. C. O. B. O. T. S. (2020). Acceptability and Feasibility of Proposed Control and Prevention Strategies for Bovine Tuberculosis among Ethiopian Dairy Farmers and Associated Professionals. Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 105184. doi:10.1016/j.prevetmed.2020.105184

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