The next big challenge!

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The Institute will bring policymakers and practitioners together from across disciplines, alongside world-class researchers to develop collaborative approaches to the challenge of prosperity.

Published: Friday 16 May, 2014



Henrietta L. Moore has been appointed to lead the new Institute of Global Prosperity at University College London (UCL). The institute will be part of The Bartlett, UCL’s Faculty of the Built Environment in October when Professor Moore joins UCL.

It will examine what sustainable lifestyles will involve for societies across the globe and how they can be developed and maintained in the face of environmental pressures, economic crises and social conflicts. It will focus its efforts on understanding how local, national and global institutions can be transformed to promote the efficient use and sharing of our resources, technologies, knowledge and capital at all levels. With initial research units based in London and Africa, the Institute aims to stimulate original debate on new models for economic, social and cultural prosperity, develop innovative multidisciplinary research, and help to shape the education of the next generation of business, civil society and government leaders on a global scale.

The Institute will bring policymakers and practitioners together from across disciplines, alongside world-class researchers to develop collaborative approaches to the challenge of prosperity. It also aims to make the integration of non-academic knowledge and expertise an important aspect of its work, with the integration of entrepreneurs, civil society activists and ordinary citizens as co-producers in research and problem solving a key aim.

Visit the website of UCL’s Institute for Global Prosperity here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett...

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