UKAID | https://www.flickr.com/photos/dfid/

What should the UK do about foreign aid?

These new models will mean learning lessons from around the world - many of which will come from communities on the front line in the fight against climate change.

Published: Thursday 18 February, 2016



The UK is about to pass legislation committing it to ringfencing 0.7% of gross national income for international development spending. Prof Henrietta Moore offers a personal perspective on the way forward.

What has been agreed?

The International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Bill is on the cusp of becoming law.

It means that 0.7% of the UK's gross national income (GNI) will be ringfenced for international aid spending. The target will be legally binding on future governments.

This makes Britain the first nation in the G7 to honour a commitment agreed by the United Nations as far back as 1970.

In cash terms, it will mean spending around £12bn of taxpayers' money on development assistance in the current year.

[…]

Read the full article on the BBC website

Share this article:




Recent Posts

Henrietta Moore: The new unitary authorities should be outriders for further devolution

Media

Read More

"We are being suffocated by fossil fuel emissions on a daily basis"

Commentary

Recent research shows that Lebanon could witness an increase of 1.2 to 3.2 degrees in temperatures in areas that are already very arid and suffer from water shortage. An increase in temperature and a decrease in precipitation will have particular impact on the electricity sector - a higher cooling demand in summer and increased consumption for electricity. Rising sea levels and water scarcity in Lebanon could lead to internal climate migration and mass displacement from rural to coastal regions affecting agricultural output, jobs and livelihoods. The economic situation in the cities that are already prone to poverty, illiteracy and unemployment could become worse.

Read More

Measuring the Good Life

Commentary

At the IGP we fundamentally believe that citizens and communities should be at the centre of efforts to reimagine prosperity and to define what matters to them for a good quality of life. We do not assume what matters; we ask people to tell us what matters to them.

Read More