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“We need a new model of economic growth”

Published: Tuesday 27 May, 2014



Henrietta L. Moore on her new UCL Institute in the NewStart online magazine, 21 May 2014:

Sitting here on a beautiful day in London with all the newspaper headlines saying the feel-good factor is coming back, it’s very easy to think that everything that’s happened since 2008 was just a terrible nightmare and now we can all relax.

But I do not believe that is the case. This week the Sunday Times Rich List quoted the largest ever annual growth in wealth of the richest people in the UK and the recent OECD report put inequality at the highest rate for several decades. If you look at the American figures, from 1976 to 2007, 1% of the population in the USA took 40% of the income.

So in a bold bid to uncover an alternative to what I believe is the current failed model of economic growth, I am joining UCL this summer to launch the world’s first Global Prosperity Institute to try to tackle this issue.

[…]

Read more http://newstartmag.co.uk/your-blogs/we-need-a-new-model-of-economic-growth/

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