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Professor Henrietta Moore helps to launch the UCL Campaign

Published: Tuesday 27 September, 2016



On Thursday 15 September, Professor Henrietta Moore joined a panel of world-class academics for the launch of the new UCL Campaign.

The launch event invited panelists to answer the question: ‘How will society survive to the 22nd century?’. Alongside Professor Moore, the panel included the UK’s first Breakthrough Prize winner Professor John Hardy (Institute of Neurology), international human rights expert Professor Philippe Sands (Faculty of Laws), space scientist Professor Lucie Green (Department of Space & Climate Change Physics), and Dr Kevin Fong (Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme Environment Medicine).

Professor Henrietta Moore advocated for a radical re-conceptualisation of ‘prosperity’, moving away from imagining prosperity simply as GDP growth. GDP, she argued, cannot measure what really matters in life, what makes life worth living. During the Q&A, Professor Moore referred to her theory of the ‘ethical imagination’, enriching a conversation about the necessity of empathy in a world that cannot seem to achieve long-lasting peace.

You can read a summary of the event on the UCL Campaign webpages.




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