Feminist Anthro

‘The Future of Gender or the End of a Brilliant Career’

Published: Monday 18 September, 2006



Bringing together distinguished scholars and original voices from anthropology’s diverse subfields, Feminist Anthropology: Past, Present, and Future probes critical issues in the study of gender, sex, and sexuality. Contributors offer significant reflections on feminist anthropology’s winding trajectory. In so doing, they examine what it means to practice feminist anthropology today, at a time when the field is perceived as fragmented and contentious. By uniting around shared feminist concerns, Feminist Anthropology establishes a common ground for varied practitioners. A holistic perspective allows for effective and creative dialogue on such issues as performativity, pedagogy, heteronormativity, difference, and identity. In addition, the volume provides a vital assessment of the history and current state of feminist theorizing within the discipline as a whole by identifying three issues central to future feminist analyses: the critical reenvisioning of old interpretations, the political and practical aspects of the academy, and the critique of heteronormativity. Throughout the volume, these topics are explored, deconstructed, and transformed. The enduring contribution of Feminist Anthropology book lies in its contributors’ efforts to place their work within the larger context of social theory, while acknowledging and focusing on the realities of anthropological practice and politics.

Moore, Henrietta L. (2006). ‘The Future of Gender or the End of a Brilliant Career’ in P. Geller and M. Stockett (eds.), Feminist Anthropology: Past, Present and Future (pp. 23-42). Pennsylvania, USA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Purchase Feminist Anthropology: Past, Present and Future here.

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