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Migration is a part of today’s world. We can’t just shut the borders, whatever the Leave campaign tells you

So migration is simply a feature of our world as it is now. It’s the “new normal”. Fortifying our borders in a misguided attempt to protect “our wealth” without doing anything to redress the global inequalities that are at the root of the problem will solve nothing.

Published: Monday 20 June, 2016



And so our membership of one of the world’s greatest multinational partnerships has been reduced to a single-issue protest over immigration. The dog whistle has been dispensed with.

Now, with less than a week to go, those who wish us to leave the European Union have plugged their rhetoric into a speaker that emits a continuous low but all too audible hum.

An imagined tidal wave of immigrant bogeymen – from Poles to Romanians, Turks to Syrians – is now the backdrop to the big vote. Polls indicate this crude xenophobia is having its desired effect.

The laser-like focus on immigration has left the Remain side struggling to counter. But with World Refugee Day on June 20th and the referendum just days later, we must call out these tactics for what they are, and get real about immigration in the modern world.

Read the full article on the Independent website

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