Brexit

If we leave Europe, the price will be paid by the poor

Coupled with the removal of EU structural funds, the poorest people and the poorest regions would instead be entirely at the mercy of Westminster governments handing out scraps from the table.

Published: Wednesday 23 March, 2016



Out of Europe, the divide between the have-nots and the have-yachts would only get wider.

Once the dust has settled on tomorrow’s Budget fanfare, it will be for the eagle-eyed to go through George Osborne’s figures in detail to see where the axe will fall.

But this we know: a further £4bn or so shaved off unprotected departmental budgets is going to hurt someone. Coming just a week or so after MPs voted through a £30-per-week cut to the Employment and Support Allowance benefit received by half a million disabled people, there will be vulnerable groups up and down the land feeling understandably nervous.

Read the full article on the New Statesman-site

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