Cutting Down Trees

Cutting Down Trees: Gender, Nutrition and Agricultural Change in the Northern Province of Zambia, 1890-1990

Henrietta L. Moore and Megan Vaughan

'...shatters some conventional wisdom about agricultural strategies and migrant labor.ory, politics, culture, and economy over a century, relating national and regional changes to intimate aspects of daily life. It is not only largely successful in this, but also makes an important methodological and theoretical contribution to understandings of gender and agrarian change.'

Melissa Leach in AFRICAN AFFAIRS

Published: January, 1994



In part this book is a reconstruction of an African agricultural system over one hundred years; in part it is an examination of the construction of knowledge about a rural African people. The first half of the book focuses on the "chitemene" agricultural system of the Bemba known as "slash and burn". The authors show that "chitemene" involves a great deal more than the cutting and burning of trees. The second half addresses the question of labour migration and its effects on the agricultural production of the area, re-visiting the colonial debate with new evidence.

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