Encounters

Encounters

Event Details

Wednesday 3 July, 2013

Date & Time: 3 - 4 July 2013
Venue: Morgan Centre for the Study of Relationships and Personal Life, University of Manchester

Encounters are central in the ways that personal and everyday life are lived, in all their complexity and nuance. Even fleeting encounters can matter profoundly, and can speak to the multi-layered nature of the experience of living. Encounters can be lenses for and animations of our ways of knowing the world. Encounters enliven debate and argument about where such knowledge comes from, how it gains potency and vitality, and about what kinds of attentiveness to the world we need to use in creating it.

This major conference we will use the idea of Encounters as a starting point for interdisciplinary dialogue around the following kinds of themes:

Personal encounters | Sensory encounters | Intimate encounters | Encounting the other | Material encounters | Inter-species encounters | Bio-genetic encounters | Neural encounters | Socio-cultural encounters | Imaginary encounters | Fleeting encounters | Encountering nature | Spatial encounters | Temporal encounters | Interdisciplinary encounters | Dreadful encounters | Unexpected encounters | Revelatory encounters | Spiritual encounters | Biographical encounters | Serendipitous encounters

For more information visit the Morgan Centre’s website:

http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/morgancentre/events/2012-13/encounters/

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