The Social Life Of Achievement

The Social Life of Achievement

Edited by Nicholas J. Long and Henrietta L. Moore

"The range of ethnographic settings is dazzling... there is something here for everyone and a veritable cornucopia for the lover of ethnographic diversity."

American Ethnologist

Published: November, 2013



What happens when people “achieve”? Why do reactions to “achievement” vary so profoundly? And how might an anthropological study of achievement and its consequences allow us to develop a more nuanced model of the motivated agency that operates in the social world? These questions lie at the heart of this volume. Drawing on research from Southeast Asia, Europe, the United States, and Latin America, this collection develops an innovative framework for explaining achievement’s multiple effects—one which brings together cutting-edge theoretical insights into politics, psychology, ethics, materiality, aurality, embodiment, affect and narrative. In doing so, the volume advances a new agenda for the study of achievement within anthropology, emphasizing the significance of achievement as a moment of cultural invention, and the complexity of “the achiever” as a subject position.

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